VSTS 2010 Tips for Solving the Unexpected Test Timeout and Test Iteration Limit in Load Test

by Joe Chen 2010-01-22 16:44

While I was doing load test last month, I ran into some issues that wasn’t common from Google search. Therefore, I decided to share the solution to benefit my fellow developers.

Unexpected timeout at the 30th minute:

Issue: The load test got aborted at the 30th minute.

Solution:

If you need to run a test for more than 30 minutes and it got aborted at the 30th minute, it probably is caused by a default setting in the test setting. Here is how to resolve it:

1. Go to the Edit Test Setting; select your current active test setting.

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2. Test Setting window prompt, unchecked it or give it a higher value.

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Test iterations limit for the access method “Unique” in the data binding:

Issue: Test agent can only retrieves half of test data from the data source.

Solution:

If you are using data binding in your web test and the access method is set to be “Unique”. You better be aware that the test data will be spread across the number of agents that running for the load test!

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For example, if the test data contains 100 records, and there are two agents running. Agent A will have access to the 50 rows; Agent B will have access to the other 50 rows. This makes perfect sense when both Agent A and Agent B are running the same web test A that data binding to data source A.

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But what if Agent A is running web test A with the unique access to database A, and Agent B is running web test B that data binding to a different database source? Does Agent A still have access to 50 rows only? The answer is YES! Even thought Agent A and B are running two different web tests that data binding to different data sources, the “Unique” access method still apply the # of test data divided the # of agent. So next time if you’re wondering why the test agent isn’t retrieve all test data from the data source, check the data binding method.

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